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School district’s superintendent donates his $10k bonus to pay high school seniors’ college application fees

School district’s superintendent donates his $10k bonus to pay high school seniors’ college application fees

School district's superintendent donates his $10k bonus to pay high school seniors' college application fees.
School district’s superintendent donates his $10k bonus to pay high school seniors’ college application fees. Source: Marietta School District

A school superintendent oversees the daily operations and the long-range planning of a school district. Serving as the point person for all district matters, the role of a superintendent is to supervise school principals and district staff, work with school board members and to manage fiscal operations. And apparently part of those fiscal operations include donating your first $10k bonus so kids can apply to college.

The college application process can be daunting, but for some high school seniors in Marietta, Georgia, it just got a little bit easier. The school district’s superintendent, Grant Rivera, decided to donate his first-ever $10,000 bonus to help students applying to college.

Applying to schools is not only time-consuming, it can also get expensive. Application fees average about $43, according to U.S. News and World Report, but some run between $70 and $90 each. Rivera, who makes a base salary of $190,136, will be giving his bonus money to the Marietta Schools Foundation, which will distribute it to students in need, the AJC reports.

School district's superintendent donates his $10k bonus to pay high school seniors' college application fees.
School district’s superintendent donates his $10k bonus to pay high school seniors’ college application fees. Source: Marietta School District

Rivera told the newspaper he expects 150 to 200 students in the 500-student senior class to apply for college, but that number could go higher. He said he hopes the donation will encourage students to apply to college early, which may give them a better chance of being accepted and receiving financial aid packages.

“My hope is that it’s an incentive for kids to do the right thing,” Rivera told AJC.

Rivera, who became superintendent in 2016, is entitled to a bonus every three years, but said his work alone isn’t what earns him the extra cash — it’s the work of the entire school system’s employees. “I don’t believe that a bonus provided by the board should be earned on the backs of the teachers,” Rivera said.

The news about Rivera’s donation was shared on the school district’s Facebook page. Many people thanked him for being so caring toward the students and a true leader.

Source CNN


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